Core Rules: Combat and Damage

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Combat and Damage

Combat is split into turns, and each turn of combat lasts about 3-5 seconds in game time.

Combat Objectives

  • Kill opponent
  • Incapacitate opponent
  • Escape

If any of these things are achieved by a character, then they are assumed to have met an objective for combat. Once an objective has been met, combat is complete.

If a character is killed, incapacitated or escaped from, then they officially 'lose' the combat.

Escaping from combat isn't a case of 'jump backwards, then jump back in again'. It is an involved and committed break from combat - oftentimes into a hiding spot or somesuch. It's up to the GM to decide when a combat has officially ended.

Engagement

Engagement is when you are toe to toe with your foe - usually to attempt to stab them or hit them with heavy blunt objects. In engagement, you cannot use long rifles or heavy ranged weapons. You can use pistols, but they will use your combat skill to hit rather than your shooting skill.

Combat Actions

This is a list of actions that you may take during combat. On your turn, you may perform any number of the following, in any order, until you run out of Actions. This list is indicative, you may do things not covered here with the approval of the GM. For example, you might wish to spend an action pulling a level to drop something on your foes.

 EffectActionsMovementTest(s) Needed
Draw / change / holster a weaponDraw a weapon, change the hand that a weapon is in, or holster it away.1Still, Walking and JoggingNone needed
Attack

Attack with a weapon (or your fists / legs / head / whatever). If you charge into combat from a sprint, and first attack hits, the target must pass a balance test or get knocked back d3 yards.

Rarely an attack will take more than 1 action to complete, and will be noted as such in the weapon's profile.

1+Still, Walking, Jogging and SprintingCombat Skill (Agi + Per) for engagement, or Shooting Skill (Pse + Per) for ranged attacks.
Reload

All ranged weapons require ammunition of some variety. Guns use bullets, bows use arrows, javelins are their own ammunition, and so on. Once all the ammunition in a ranged weapon has been used, it must be reloaded to attack again.

The number of actions it takes to fully reload a ranged weapon are noted in that weapon's profile. Some weapons may also be partly reloaded, and will again note any special considerations and the number of actions required.

Unless the GM gives special dispensation otherwise, reloading requires both hands. It cannot be combined with an action that would require the character's hands to enact. For example, you cannot reload and climb at the same time.

1+Still, WalkingNone needed.
Defend

A character that is defending does not attack, but instead defends against others' attacks. Defending applies a -8 penalty for anyone to hit the defending character, or -4 when combined if the character combines their defense with any other action, including talking.

Defending cannot be combined with attack, grapple, guard, or stun. Note down that the character is defending so that the players and GM do not forget.

1Still, WalkingNone needed
GrappleGrapple your opponent. When grappled, only light weapons or attacks with body parts (punching / kicking / etc.) can be used by both you and your opponent. Grapple assumes an attack occurs at the same time. If the attack misses, the grapple is not successful.1Still, Walking and JoggingCombat Skill (Agi + Per)
FeintFeint your opponent, confusing them as to your next attack. Your next attack cannot be dodged or parried. Feint also gives a +4 bonus to any escape attempt on the next action.1Still, Walking and JoggingCombat Skill (Agi + Per)
Guard

You guard an area with your weapon or spell, or wait in the shadows for someone to come within striking distance.

Establish a kill zone - an area 45° in front of the character and up to half the range of your weapon. If the weapon that the character is guarding with is a close combat weapon, then assume that the range half their charging distance. The moment someone enters the kill zone, you may shoot at them / stab at them.

If they survive, they must take an immediate -4 nerve test (Ldr + Wil). If they fail that test they must run or dive for the nearest cover. If the situation warrants it, the GM may alter the penalty of the nerve test if they deem the situation warrants it.

You can opt to end guarding at any time, but it is interrupted by any action other than guarding again, talking, or taking your shot.

You can maintain guarding for up to Toughness bonus in hours, after which you must spend time refreshing yourself / eating / going to the toilet / etc. The time that the charcter must spent resting after guarding is determined by the GM.

1+StillNone needed
Talking

Communicating is a 'free' action, and may be combined without penalty to the other action.

Anything that can be said in about 5 seconds can be stated in an action. You can talk and guard at the same time.

0n/aNone needed
StunCan only be used with a blunt weapon; or a ranged weapon or spell specifically designed to stun. Roll to hit as normal, and apply damage as normal reduced by either d6 or d10, depending on which the weapon uses. This damage cannot increase their level of injury on a location. In addition to the damage, the target gains another 1d3 levels of temporary fatigue.1Still, Walking and JoggingCombat Skill (Agi + Per) for engagement, or Shooting Skill (Pse + Per) for ranged attacks.
Escape

An escape test is rolled like a standard attack, except on success no damage is done: Instead, the target that your character would like to escape from opposes the attack with a dodge test.

If you win the opposed roll, then you will have successfully 'escaped' from engagement, and are free to move and what-have-you on your next action. This would usually be to run away, or hide, or something else.

1Still, Walking, Jogging and SprintingCombat Skill (Agi + Per),
Dodge (Agi + Per)
AimAiming adds +2 to your to-hit roll for your next ranged attack: either magical or with a ranged weapon. You can aim for a total of 4 actions in a row. Any action other than aiming will cause your aim to be lost, including talking.1StillNone needed
DelayYou delay your action(s) until your opponents take theirs. If you opponent also delays, the person you delays last must take their delayed actions first.*n/an/an/a
Dodge (special)

After being successfully hit in melee or hit with a ranged attack - that you are both aware of and know the source to - you may elect to dodge.

Dodging happens outside the normal turn sequence, and occurs after the opponent's hit roll. Roll a dodge test - if you're successful, then the hit is 'dodged' and no damage is done. The attack may still 'hit', but not with enough force to do any damage.

Each time you successfully dodge in the same combat turn, the target number for the next dodge or resist test suffers a -4 penalty. For example, if you successfully dodge needing a 30 or less, then the next dodge that you make in this combat turn will need a 26 or less. After that, it would be an 22 or less, and so on.

The penalties for dodges and resists stack. For example, if you resist and then dodge in the same combat turn, you are at -8 for the next of either test.

0Still, Walking and JoggingDodge
(Agi + Per)

Resist
(special)

After being successfully assailed by a magical attack that is not a melee ability or a ranged attack - that you are both aware of and know the source to - then you can attempt to resist the attack.

Resist works exactly the same way as dodge, except it uses a resist roll.

The penalties for dodges and resists stack. For example, if you resist and then dodge in the same combat turn, you are at -8 for the next of either test.

0Still, Walking and JoggingResist
(Tgh + Wil)
Parry
(special)

After being attacked in engagement, you may elect to parry. You can parry any time that you can dodge.

The character must be armed with a weapon capable of parrying blows - usually one sturdy enough not to break under stress and large enough to reliably get in the way. Weapons that cannot parry will note such. Parry cannot normally be used whilst the character is unarmed unless skills, talents or training allow for it.

Most weapons will also have a parry penalty - this is a negative modifier to the parry roll, but after any successive parry penalties (see below).

A parry is rolled to hit like a normal attack using combat skill, but instead of hitting the opponent, it negates their attack. Like dodges and resists, each successive parry against in the same combat turn accrues a -4 penalty. These do not stack with the penalties for dodging or resisting.

0Still, Walking and JoggingCombat Skill (Agi + Per)
Ready WeaponReadying a weapon in the character's hand(s) that has been stored away in a pocket, bag, etc. A weapon that has been stored away in a dedicated scabbard / holster / etc. takes 1 less action than it would normally.2Still, Walking. Add another 2 actions if Jogging.None needed

* This is to stop lower initiative characters from forcing the hand of higher initiative characters who delay before them.

Combat Steps

  1. Roll for initiative
  2. Character with the highest initiative value that has not yet acted states intent
  3. Undertake actions (including any attacks and whatnots) and resolve any damage or effects
  4. Describe the action(s) narratively
  5. Go to step 2 and repeat until all characters have acted this turn.
  6. Repeat steps 2 to 5 as many times as necessary until combat is complete.

Roll Initiative

Initiative is a Int + Agi test. The GM might wish to apply a bonus / penalty to this test for mitigating factors (such as an ambush for example).

The target number of an initiative roll is always the value of the character's initiative skill (see skills). Subtract the character's roll from their target number, and the difference between them is that character's initiative value for this combat. If the character rolled over their target number, then they would have a negative initiative value. Characters act in order of initiative values from highest to lowest.

For example, if a character needed to roll under 30 and rolled 26, then their initiative value is 4. If they had rolled 32, their initiative value would be -2.

State Intent

The first thing that happens in a combat turn is that the character states their intent. State the intent up to the maximum number of actions that the character can undertake in a combat turn - normally 2.

The intent should be phrased as an action, not as a result. For example: "I draw my sword (action 1) and attack with it (action 2)." is what you are after, not "I kill him". No measuring should take place at this stage, players must use their best judgement to gauge distances.

As combat is tremendously fluid, things can happen between actions that would render following actions moot. If this happens, a character can roll an assault test (Agi + Int) to change their remaining action(s). For example, if a character wants to shoot at an enemy and duck behind cover to avoid a counter-attack, and that enemy is felled on the first shot. If the character passes an assault test, they can then reassign their second action to something more useful now that the first has completed.

Roll to Hit

Usually, if you're attacking, the next thing you need to do is roll to hit ones target.

Use combat skill (Agi + Rea) for melee attacks, or shooting skill (Pse + Rea) for ranged attacks. Add the bonus for the level of training that the character has with their weapon to your target number:

 Skill LevelBonus
0Untrained0
1Poor+1
2Substandard+2
3Basic+3
4Intermediate+4
5Well Versed+5
6Advanced+6
7Master+7
8 or 9Grand Master+8 or +9

The stance of the target also affects the roll:

 Modifier to hit
Standing0

Melee attack vs. prone target

+2
Ranged attack vs. prone target-2

If you roll under your target number you hit with enough force to do some damage. If you roll under half of your combat skill or shooting skill, roll for damage twice and add both your first and second damage rolls together. If you score an epic success, you can roll for damage 3 times (Although the GM may wish to reward the epic success differently if desired).

Surprise and Nerve

If an attack that hits a target is made without the target knowing from where and/or from whom the attack originated, that target is said to be surprised. Any surprised target must make a nerve test (Wil + Ldr). If they fail, the character must immediately dive for the nearest cover, or to the ground and become prone, at the choice of that character's player. Continued attacks made against the character without the whereabouts of the attacker being known will cause continued nerve tests.

Location

If you've hit your foe, the next thing to do is to find out where.

Roll 1d10 against the following table for humanoids and other 4 limbed animals:

RollLocation
1,0Left Leg
2,-1Right Leg
3,4Left Arm
5,6Right Arm
7,8,9,12Body
10,11Head

Although the legs are generally bigger than the arms of any humanoid creature, the arms are much more likely to get in the way in combat, hence the increased chance of them getting hit.

In engagement, a character's vertical location relative to that of their target must also be taken into account. If the target that in engagement has their feet least at the attacker's waist height, then subtract 2 from the location roll. If attacker's feet are at least at their target's waist height, add 2 to the location roll. An example would be if two opponents were duelling, and one of jumped onto a table.

Although normally you can't roll a -1, 0, 11 or 12 on a d10, they are included in the chart above so that the left leg or head doesn't get disproportionately targetted when a target is above or below their attacker whilst in engagement.

Damage

Once you've hit your target, and found out where exactly the hit is, you must roll to see how much damage is done. Check the weapon profile for it's base damage. Add your strength bonus as a damage bonus if it's a melee attack.

Armour reduces any incoming damage by an amount equal to its armour value. Cover will also decrease the amount of damage taken. The GM should rule for appropriate armour values for cover. Some sample cover values are:

Example of coverProtection
offered
Tall wooden fence that blocks line of sight4
Sturdy wooden crate6
A chunky barrel full of stuff8
A solid wall12
A sturdy wooden door6

If the damage done in one hit (before deductions for armour but after any other modifiers) is above the target's knockback threshold, then they are knocked back d3 yards. The target must also make a balance test or fall prone.

If the damage done in one hit (after deductions for armour and any other modifiers) exceeds the target's shock threshold, then they must pass a constitution test or are knocked unconscious, being reduced to 0 fatigue instantly, all points temporary.

Injury

Injury has 2 very important metrics: Your character's level of fatigue; and your character's conciousness threshold, namely how much total damage they've taken in total. Being at 0 fatigue or incurring damage over your conciousness threshold will render you unconcious, and therefore at the mercy of your enemies and/or friends.

Fatigue

Fatigue is a very important measure of how physically exhausted and battered a character is, and is broadly analogous to hit points.

Types

There are two types: temporary and permanent.

Temporary fatigue covers things like cuts, bruises, knocks and other uncomfortable but not life altering damage - and will go away with rest. Some particularly arduous physical activities might also incur some fatigue. Unless specified otherwise, all fatigued gained is temporary fatigue.

Permanent fatigue is usually inflicted as part of a wound, and will note explicitly that it is permanent fatigue. Permanent fatigue will only be removed when its underlying cause has been dealt with or healed from. For example, if permanent fatigue is as a result of a heavily injured limb, then that injury must be healed before the fatigue can be lifted.

Fatigue Loss

Characters start with their health score in fatigue points. When a character takes fatigue, such as though injuries or over-exertion, remove fatigue points as necessary.

After a character has lost half of their fatigue points, they become exhausted (see injury effects below). When they reach 0 fatigue, they will lose conciousness. Once unconscious, over a small time scale they're at the mercy of the other characters and enemies - make sure you have friends who won't pull some nefarious practical jokes on you!

If a character is ever reduced to the negative equivalent of their health score in fatigue, they die. For example, if you have 12 fatigue, at -12 you would perish. Being beaten that resoundly is never healthy.

Minimum Fatigue

If any humanoid character's health score is below 6 (small children for example), then they can take up to 6 levels of fatigue. Other critters, animals and targets that aren't humanoid in nature can have fewer than 6 fatigue if they are of low enough health.

Consciousness Threshold

Every time the character sustains damage, note it down as a running tally. If ever the total amount of damage the character recieves goes above their consciousness threshold, they will lose consciousness. If the total amount of damage that a character recieves ever goes above twice their consciousness threshold, they will die.

Injury Effects

Stat Penalties

Some injuries will apply stat penalties. For example, getting clobbered around the head hard enough will affect a character's Int and Per scores. All stat penalties are 'permanent' in the same way as perminent fatigue: they will continue to effect the character until the underlying injury is recovered from.

Stats that have been reduced may effect bonuses derived from them. Simply note down the revised stats on your character sheet until the level of injury that caused them is healed.

Exhaustion

Once you lose half of your levels of Fatigue, you are exhausted. Whilst exhausted:

  • You suffer a -4 penalty to all tests
  • All of your movement rates are halved
  • You no longer add your strength bonus to physical attacks
  • You no longer add your intelligence bonus to magic attacks

Stunning

Stunning is instant and will generally only last a few seconds. Whilst stunned, a character may not act under the control of the player, but may do something instinctive if the situation warrants it. For example, if a particularly loud explosion happens right on top of a character and they survive, then they may well be 'stunned' due to them clutching their ears and yelling "Ow, my ears!".

You will recover from being stunned automatically at the end of the stun duration.

If in doubt and it is pertinent, ask the GM what your character is doing whilst stunned.

Bleeding

Bleeding is the act of major blood loss over a short period. It is likely that a character will already be have plenty of flesh wounds decorated with blood by the time they start bleeding, but bleeding here this covers blood loss that will be deadly in very short order unless sorted.

Every 4 combat turns (or 30 seconds out of combat), you gain a point of fatigue until the bleeding is stopped. This fatigue is gained regardless of the character's state of consciousness. In combat, this isn't too much of a problem, as combat happens relatively quickly. However, there is a good chance that over a relatively short period you will bleed to death. Make sure that you are with someone who can patch you up if you're bleeding this seriously.

To staunch bleeding, a character must pass a successful first aid test (others or self, depending on the target). They must be equipped with a bandage or other suitable apparatus for constructing a torniquet to stop bleeding. Rope, clothing or anything that can be tied tightly can be used. Bleeding will stop if the level of injury that caused it is healed from.

Injury Location

Each location of your character's body has a level of injury associated with it. These are minor, light, heavy, major and severe. With each level of injury come the effects of that injury, both immediate and sustained. Immediate effects are applied only once that level of injury has ben achieved, and are not applied again unless the character has recovered and is injured to that level again. Sustained effects are effects continue to affect the character until the injury has been healed.

When taking damage, the health of the character is used to determine how much injury they sustain to a location. If the damage done, after deductions for armour, cover and modifiers is greater than their health score, then that location gains a level of injury. If it's 2 times greater than their health score, then they gain 2 levels of injury, and so on.

For example - if a character has 10 health, and incurred damage of 11, they would gain 1 point of injury to that location. If they had incurred 29 damage, then they would gain 2 levels of injury to that location. 30 would of course give them 3 injury levels, and so on. All of this damage gets recorded against the character's consciousness threshold, as noted above.

Once they have gained an injury level, only dedicated healing can reduce it again. Oftentimes, if the injury isn't too severe, first aid and rest are sufficient. Injury levels are cumulative - if a character has 2 injury levels already, and they suffer another 2 to the same location, they will have 4 levels of injury. It should be noted, 4 levels of injury is generally pretty unhealthy!

LocationLevelEffect
Head (10,11)Minor

Immediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or your character is stunned for 1 action.
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take another point of fatigue.

Light

Sustained:
Take 1 point of permanent fatigue.
Reduce your Pse, Int and Per by 2.
Immediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Character is stunned for 1 turn.
Pass a balance test (Str + Pse) or fall prone.
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take yet another point of fatigue.

Heavy

Sustained:
Take 1 point of permanent fatigue.
Reduce your Pse, Int and Per by another 4.
Immediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Character is stunned for D5 turns.
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take yet another point of permanent fatigue.
Pass a balance test (Str + Pse) or fall prone.

MajorSustained:
You are instantly reduced to 0 fatigue, all remaining points being permanent, and as such lose conciousness.
Reduce your Int and Per by another 6.
SevereInstant:
You die. You can't expect to take such a powerful blow to the head and survive.
Body (7,8,9,12)Minor

Immediate:
You are stunned for 1 turn.
Pass a balance test (Str + Pse) or fall prone.

LightImmediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Character is stunned for 1 turn.
Pass a balance test (Str + Pse) or fall prone.
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take another point of fatigue.
Heavy

Sustained:
Take 1 point of permanent fatigue.
Reduce your Int, Str and Tgh by 2
Immediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Character is stunned for D5 actions.
Pass a balance test (Str + Pse) or fall prone.
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take yet another point of fatigue.

MajorSustained:
Take 1 point of permanent fatigue.
Reduce your Int, Str and Tgh by another 4.
Immediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Character is stunned for D5 actions.
The character starts bleeding.
Pass a balance test (Str + Pse) or fall prone.
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take another point of fatigue.
SevereSustained:
You are instantly reduced to 0 fatigue, all additional points being permanent, and as such lose conciousness.
Reduce your Int, Str and Tgh by another 6
Arms
Left (3, 4)
Right (5, 6)
Minor

Immediate:
Pass a strength test (Str x 2) or drop what is carried in that hand.

LightImmediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Pass a strength test (Str x 2) or drop what is carried in that hand.
Heavy

Sustained:
Take 1 point of permanent fatigue.
Reduce your Str, Pse and Agi by 2.
Immediate:
Character is stunned for 1 action.
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take another point of fatigue.
Pass a strength test (Str x 2) or drop what is carried in that hand.

MajorSustained:
Take 1 point of permanent fatigue.
You cannot use the arm again until the injury has healed.
Reduce your Str, Pse and Agi by another 2.
Immediate:
Character is stunned for D5 actions.
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take another point of fatigue.
Severe*Sustained:
Take 2 points of permanent fatigue.
Reduce your Str, Pse and Agi by another 4.
Immediate:
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or you are instantly reduced to 0 fatigue, all points being permanent, and as such lose conciousness.
The character also starts bleeding.
Legs
Left (1,0)
Right (2,-1)
Minor

Immediate:
Pass a balance test (Str + Pse) or fall prone.

LightImmediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Pass a balance test (Str + Pse) or fall prone.
Heavy

Sustained:
Take 1 point of permanent fatigue.
Reduce your Str, Rea and Agi by 2.
Your movement rate is reduced by 1 yard, to a minimum of 1.
Immediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Character is stunned for 1 action.
You are knocked prone
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take another point of fatigue.

Major

Sustained:
Take 1 point of permanent fatigue.
Reduce your Str, Rea and Agi by another 2.
Your movement rate is reduced by another 4 yards, to a minimum of 1.
Immediate:
Take 1 point of fatigue.
Character is stunned for 1 action.
You are knocked prone
Pass a constitution test (Tgh + Wil) or take another point of fatigue.

Severe*

Sustained:
Pass a constitution test or you are instantly reduced to 0 fatigue, all points being permanent, and as such lose conciousness.
Reduce your Str, Rea and Agi by another 4.
Your maximum movement rate is reduced to 1 yard.
You also start bleeding.

*If more than 40 points of damage (after armour and other modifiers) has been scored in one hit on the damage roll that causes a severe injury to a limb, you pass a constitution test or lose the limb. Even if you are healed from this level of injury, you (obviously) won't get your limb back without some sort magical intervention or miracle cure. If you lose a leg, then your maximum movement rate is reduced to your Agility bonus in yards. If you lose an arm, you can no longer use that arm for any purpose. If another 40 points of damage is scored to the same limb after it sustains a severe injury, test again.

For example: if you are assailed by someone who causes 17 points of damage and this causes a severe limb injury, you won't lose the limb, although it will still be pretty mangled. If someone causes 45 points of damage and causes a severe limb injury, then you must test constitution and pray your arm or leg isn't destroyed.

Recovery from Injury

If you need to act before you're fully rested, then consider yourself suffering from exhaustion until you've recuperated. The GM should adjudicate when that is, if there is ambiguity.

NPCs and other players can assist with any constitution tests by passing a First Aid (Others) test.

Injury Levels During Combat

A character may use actions endeavouring to recover from an injury. To do this, they must pass a First Aid (Self) test, with a difficulty equal to twice the level of injury that they have on that location. For example: If a character has heavy injury on a location, the modifier for this first aid test is -6.

If passed, then they move down an injury level. By yourself, first aid may only remove 1 injury level from the maximum that you've acquired. E.g. if a character has a heavy wound, this can only be reduced to light.

When a character recovers a level of injury from an injured location they do not suffer any immediate effects again, and any sustained effects drop to that given for the injury level they've recovered to.

Exhaustion

To recover from exhaustion, characters must bring their level of fatigue up to at least three quarters after becoming exhausted. For example, if they start with 12 levels of fatigue, and are knocked down to 5 from some epic long distance running, they will need to get back up to at least 9 to stop feeling exhausted again.

Bleeding

Bleeding will stop if the level of injury that caused it is healed from. It can be temporarily stopped by the judicious use of tight bandages and torniquets.

Regaining Fatigue

To regain fatigue, a character can either rest, or will have to pass a constitution test every hour in game to regain a level of fatigue. They may well still have injuries that give permanent fatigue that need recovering from, and as such may need longer to heal.

To regain conciousness from being unconscious, a character must regain at least half of their fatigue levels, and will be exhausted until they reach three quarters of their total fatigue. It may well be the case that they have enough permanent levels of fatigue to keep them unconscious - in which case, they can be considered to be in a coma.

Resting and Sleeping

Characters will generally need to sleep each evening to recuperate from their day's activities. Even if a character hasn't done anything strenusous, they will eventually lose consciousness for a few hours each night. Assuming that a character sleeps on a patch of dry floor with no covering, they must sleep for at least 6 hours a night in order to be rested enough for the next day, and must sleep for at least 8 hours a night in order to regain levels of fatigue or recover from injury. Beds, blankets and so forth will give extra bonuses when characters sleep.

Fatigue Recovery

Characters will recover 2 levels of fatigue for each full night's rest, without any bonuses from good sleeping arrangements.

Injury

Characters can recover from injury levels by resting. Injuries reduce in severity by one level after the amount of rest required to cure that level has been reached. For example: if a character has a heavy injury to the leg, after 25 nights of rest has passed they will now have a light injury instead. Further rest will eventually remove the injury completely, assuming that it is not further agitated. Characters can still act normally whilst their injuries are recovering, if they are able, but are obviously more vulnerable to further injury.

A minor injury will be cured by 5 nights of rest; light injuries will be removed after another 10 nights. Heavy injuries require 25 nights of rest, major injuries need 50, and severe injuries require 100. Characters can reduce the time required to heal by their toughness bonus, down to a minimum of 1 night. As their levels of injury are reduced, any permanent fatigue that those injuries has caused is removed accordingly.

Heavy, major and severe injuries are best tended to at dedicated healing facilities. Many places of worship often double as places of medical care, especially away from large population centres.

Characters that are injured can be tended to by others who have the First Aid skill. See the Skills page for further details on caring for others.

Comfort

Sleeping is generally conditional on a suitable level of comfort being acquired before losing consciousness for a few hours.

In a settlement, dwellings will generally offer a specific place to engage in this activity: often known as beds. In the wilds, characters will often need to take their own form of shelter in order to rest - tents and so forth. Characters that sleep in a bed, or on at least on an insulating bedroll of some kind, will gain an extra point of fatigue recovery each night. A proper blanket to sleep under will give characters another extra level of fatigue recovery per night, as well as letting them gain normal recovery with 6 hours sleep. Characters will generally need to be warm enough and dry enough to doze off.

Characters that rest in proper beds (or equivalent bedrolls and blankets) whilst sleeping can also double their toughness bonus reduction for the time it takes to recover from injury levels.

GM Tips: Be consistent when ruling what a 'proper blanket' is - a rule of thumb would be a covering suitable for maintaning body temperature in the appropriate climate. When figuring out if a character would be dry and/or comfortable enough to sleep, take into account any sleeping equipment the character has, and the local climate. For example: in the middle of a warm jungle, characters will likely get too hot from sleeping under a fluffy blanket designed for temperate climates, but conversely will likely suffer from all kinds of bug bites without a good mosquito net in their tent or dwelling. Characters could also fall asleep in a warm bath, despite it obviously being as wet as wet gets, although they wouldn't gain any bonuses from proper sleeping facilities.

Sleeping in Armour

Characters can attempt to rest in any armour that they possess if they feel it necessary, but generally armour is designed for protection rather than comfort. Characters that sleep in heavy armour and/or with their weapons strapped to them won't gain any injury or fatigue recovery. Characters can sleep normally in light armour, but cannot gain any bonuses from proper sleeping facilities to do so. The GM should ensure that characters are not overburdened with things likely to cause discomfort during the night: like buckles, belts, hardened leather and pointy bits that are all likely to detract from a character's comfort.