Gear: Weapons

[toc list: ol; title: Table of Contents; minlevel: 2; maxlevel: 4; attachments: 1;]

Weaponry Skills

Training in weaponry skills is identical to training skills in general skills: You gain days of training, usually in between adventures, that you can spend on improving your skill in certain areas. Unlike most general skill training as noted on the skills page, each type of weapon has an associated skill type to invest in.

A lot of training for weaponry skills overlap - training for one type of weapon can often be used for a similar type of weapon. Ranged weapons in particular might share skill levels for different types. Any skills that are shared in this manner will usually apply half of their bonus to attacks with similar, but not identical, weapons; but not any bonuses to reload times if applicable.

Proficiency for a particular group of weaponry skills is decided by the highest skill level if more than one skill overlaps. For example, if a character very well practiced in with both clubs and unarmed combat - the highest of these two would give the character's attack bonus for improvized weapons.

Weaponry skills use the same training costs are other skills:

Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Time required 15 30 45 60 75 90 105 120 135

Training in a weapon skill gives a +1 bonus on a character's attack rolls for each level attained - e.g. a character with a level 4 unarmed skill can make unarmed attacks with a +4 bonus.

The time taken to learn a skill from the defaults above is reduced in days by a character's Intelligence Bonus. For example: If a character's intelligence bonus is 3 and they wish to train a skill to level 4, they would spend 57 days instead of 60.

GM Tip: You can specify if an increasing intelligence bonus works retroactively or not - that is, if a character's increasing intelligence bonus discount affects levels already achieved. This is important, as the electronic character sheets available on this website do not factor for an increasing intelligence bonus when working out how much discount a character recieves, and thus apply discounts retroactively. It is best to decide before the game begins whether to retroactive discounts are applied.

For every 3 levels that a ranged weaponry skill is trained, the reload time is either: reduced by 1 action, to a minimum of 1 action; or the number of shots that can be reloaded in a single action is increased by [1]; depending on how the weapon is reloaded.

Single Shot Firearms, Reciprocating Firearms, Muzzle Loading Firearms, White Guns, Cross Bows, Long Bows, and Thrown are ranged weaponry skills.

Unarmed, Small Blunt Weapons, Large Blunt Weapons, Small Blades, Large Blades, Polearms, and Thrown are used for close combat weapons.

Training Summary

This table lists which weapons get bonuses from which skills:

Skill Full training bonus for attacks Half training bonus
for attacks
Single shot firearms Single shot firearms
Reciprocating firearms
Muzzle loading firearms
White guns
Reciprocating firearms Single shot firearms 
Reciprocating firearms
Muzzle loading firearms
White guns
Muzzle loading firearms Muzzle loading firearms Single shot firearms Reciprocating firearms 
White guns
White gun White guns Single shot firearms Reciprocating firearms
Muzzle loading firearms 
Crossbow Crossbows Longbows
Longbow Longbows Crossbows
Unarmed Unarmed Improvised weapons
Small blunt weapons Small blunt weapons Improvised weapons
Large blunt weapons
Large blunt weapons Large blunt weapons Improvised weapons
Small blunt weapons
Large blades
Small blades Small blades Large blades
Large blades Large blades Small blades
Large blunt weapons
Polearms Polearms Improvised weapons
Thrown weapons Thrown n/a

As an example, if a character has level 4 training in large blades, granting a +4 bonus to hit, they will also get a +2 bonus for small blades and large blunt weapons. If they wished to gain a +4 bonus for small blades as well, they would need to level up the skill normally, but would still be entitled to a +2 bonus to attack until their small blades skill gives them a better bonus.

Stats

Each weapon has a few stats to describe them:

Damage: Descrbes the amount of damage that a hit from this weapon can do. Close combat weapons will often add the wielding character's strength bonus, noted "+ SB".

Type: The type of weapon. These can be either derringer, pistol, carbine, long gun, heavy gun, bow, crossbow, or thrown for ranged weapons; and light, basic, or long for close combat weapons.

Pistols and derringers are the only ranged weapons that can be used in engagement. When used in engagement both will use the wielding character's combat skill instead of their shooting skill for attacks. Carbines, long guns and heavy guns cannot shoot in engagement, as they are simply too large to be effectively brought to bear against a character's opponent. They can be used as improvised close-combat weapons, or as the relevant bayonette profile if they have a bayonette attached.

Light weapons are the only weapons that can be used when grappling. Long weapons can be used at increased range, usually 3 yards from the wielding character. If a long weapon has a range greater than this, it will state so in its profile.

Range: The range of the weapon. Although just about anything can be thrown if needed, if a weapon cannot be fired/thrown/launched reliably enough to cause major damage, then it will have a dash and thus can only be used as a weapon in engagement.

The range is given as a set of three numbers separated by slashses: short / medium / long, describing how accurate the weapon is at varying distances between the shooter and their target. If the target is:

  • Up to the short range of the weapon, a character has a +4 modifier to hit.
  • Between short and medium range, there is no modifier.
  • Between medium and long range, a character has a -4 modifier to hit.
  • Over long range, a character has a -8 modifier to hit. For every 50 yards beyond long range, a character suffers an additional -2 modifier to hit.

Most ranged weapons have a maximum range of up to 3 times their long range. Beyond this range the weapon is simply too inaccurate, or not powerful enough to reach, and will not be hit any targets. Some weapons have a shorter maximum range, and will note this in their profile.

Accuracy / Acc: The modifier to hit with this weapon.

Clip: A good number of weapons can fire a single round before needing to reload, repeating weapons are able to fire several times in a row. The clip of a weapon is how many rounds the weapon can fire before needing to be reloaded.

Reload: How many actions it takes to reload the weapon.

Repeating weapons (generally revolvers and some snap-barrel weapons) will list the reload as the number of shots that can be put into the weapon for each action spent reloading, or fraction of shots thereof. For extra clarity, these numbers will be [contained in brackets]. For example, a revolver could have a reload value of [2] and a clip of 5: for each action spent reloading the weapon a character can put up to 2 rounds into it at a time, taking 3 actions to completely reload the weapon: 2 rounds in action 1, 2 rounds in action 2, and the final round in action 3.

Ranged weapons have a bonus to reload times at training levels 3, 6 and 9. Most ranged weapons will reduce the loading time by 1 action each at bonus, although this bonus can only reduce the reload time to a minimum of 1. Repeating weapons increase the number of shots that can be reloaded in a single action by [1].

Parry: Whether or not the weapon can parry, and if so, what the penalty to the parry roll is. If a weapon is cannot parry, this will be noted "N/A".

Size: The size of the weapon. 1 to 10, 1 being very small, 10 being just small enough to be carried by 1 person because of its size. See the notes on the Equipment page for a more detailed description of size.

Weight: How much the weapon weighs.

Penetration / Pen: The penetrative power of the weapon. This is the number of armour points that this weapon will ignore, from both mundane and magical means.

Cost: The average cost of this weapon in an average location. See the notes on the Equipment page for a more detailed description of cost.

Rarity: The rarity of the weapon. 1 to 10, 10 being the rarest. See the notes on the Equipment page for a more detailed description of rarity.

Close Combat Weapons

Close combat weapons use a character's combat skill (Agi + Per) for attack rolls. The skill used for determining bonuses to hit is trained per weapon skill type. Close combat weapons that do not have any special enchantments on them cause physical damage.

Unarmed

Name Dmg Type Range Parry Size Pen Wgt. Cost Rarity
Unarmed - (punches, elbows, kicks, headbutts, etc.) 2d6+SB Light - No n/a 0 - - -
Weaponised Fist (knuckle dusters, etc) +1d6 Light - No 1 0 ½kg 10S 3
Clawed Fist (knuckle dusters with nasty knives on them - think Wolverine) +1d6+6 Light - No 4 0 1kg 2G 6

All unarmed weapons use the unarmed skill for attacks.

Unarmed weaponry training is used when a character attacks with their body parts - punches, kicks, etc. - and weapons that enhance these. Unarmed training can also be used for improvised weapons at half the level of training, if no other weapon training is available. For example, if a character decides to use their rifle in engagement as a makeshift club, they could use up to half of their unarmed skill as a bonus on their combat skill roll.

Unarmed weapons add their damage to regular unarmed attacks.

At level 6 or higher a character may parry whilst unarmed with a parry penalty of -5.

An unarmed attack with an un-bladed unarmed weapon can be used to stun.

Blunt Weapons

Name Dmg Type Range Parry Size Pen Wgt. Cost Rarity
Small Club 3d6+SB Light - -4 4 0 1-3kg 10S 1
Large Club 3d6+6+SB Basic - -6 5 1 3-7kg 35S 3
War Hammers 4d10+SB Basic - -8 6 2 7kg + 3G 50S 8

Small and large clubs weapons cover anything that's designed for bashing and clubbing, and that is specifically designed to be a weapon - such as maces, clubs, and hammers. The difference between the categories is the size of the weapon. If a weapon can feasibly be used with a single hand, it is a small club, double handed weapons are large clubs or warhammers. Both must be used with both of the character's hands: if a big club or warhammer is used singled handedly, they will count as improvised weapons and incur penalties to attack as noted below.

Small clubs use the small blunt weapons skill for attacks, whilst large clubs and war hammers use the large blunt weapons skill for attacks.

Small clubs covers things like truncheons, flails, big sticks and small hammers. Large clubs covers things such as clubs, morning stars, maces and so on. War hammers are heavy and enormous dedicated crushing weapons, although might not necessarily be an actual hammer.

Training in either small or large blunt weapons training will give half of their level as a bonus when using the other.

Blunt weapons can be used to stun.

Improvised Weapons

Improvised weapons are objects that are not designed as weapons but wielded as such, or weapons used in a way that they were not specifically designed (using a gun as a club, for example). Improvised weapons are classified as blunt weapons for determining skills used and damage.

Improvised weapons uses half the level of training attained in either small or large blunt weapons, whichever is greater. Improvised weapons suffer an additional -2 penalty to parry or block.

Improvised weapons between 1-3kg and that can be wielded in a single hand, including domestic hammers, use the small clubs weapon profile.
Improvised weapons between 3-7kg use the large clubs weapon profile.
Improvised weapons over 7kg in weight use the war hammers weapon profile.
If a character is armed with an improvised weapon above 9kg in weight: add 2 points of damage for every 1kg the object is over 9kg, and reduce the character's Agi by -1 for each extra 1kg for assault tests and attacks whilst armed with such a huge weapon.

Blades

Name Dmg Type Range Parry Size Pen Wgt. Cost Rarity
Knife 2d10+SB Light SBx2/-/- -10 1 0 ½kg 35C 1
Dagger/Dirk 3d10+SB Light SBx2/-/- -7 2 0 1kg 3S 50C 3
Small Sword 4d10+SB Basic - 0 4 1 2-3kg 2G 25S 5
Large Sword 5d10+SB Basic - -3 6 3 4-7kg 5G 75S 7

These weapons cover all fairly short weapons that are designed to slash and stab, rather than bludgeon. The difference between the two is the size of the weapon. Knives, and daggers/dirks use the small blades skill to hit, and small swords and large swords use the large blades skill to hit. Dagger and dirk are interchangeable names and identify the same class of weapon.

Large swords must be used with both hands. If a large sword is used with only one hand, they will count as a large improvised weapon. Small swords may be used with both hands to grant a +1 parry and +1 damage bonus.

Training in either small or large bladed weapons training will give half of their level as a bonus when using the other.

Some knives have serrated edges (often for cutting meat) - if they do, they can be used as a small saw too. Bear in mind the size of the serated blade when trying to saw through something - it would be almost infeasible to cut down a large tree with a pocket knife for example.

Any bladed weapon may have one, both or even no sharp edges: rapiers for example have an edge only to discourge grabbing the blade, but it cannot be used well for cutting attacks. There is no difference in the rules for stabbing and slashing attacks with any bladed weapon.

Small and large swords can be used to stun with the blunt end, treat them as small an large clubs respectively for damage, but still using the large blades skill.

Polearms

Name Dmg Type Range Parry Size Pen Wgt. Cost Rarity
Spear 3d10+5+SB Long SBx2/-/- 0 7 2 1½-3kg 15S 50C 3
Halberd 5d10+SB Long - -5 8 2 2-4kg 75S 5
Glaive / War Scythe 3d10+SB Long - -5 7 0 1½-3kg 45S 4
Staff 3d6+6+SB Basic - -3 6 1 1½-3kg 1S 1
Lance 4d10+SB Long - -10 10 3 3-6kg 55S 7
Swordstaff 5d10+SB Long - 0 6 1 1½ - 3kg 3G 8
Bayonette (attached) 4d10+SB Basic - -10 +1 1 1½ - 3kg 7S 3

Polearms cover all weapons that have long shafts as either an extension for a blade of some sort (like a spear), or where the shaft is the main offensive part of the weapon (such as staffs).

Most polearms require both hands to use effectively. If a polearm is used with only one hand, they will count as an improvised weapon. Spears and lances can be used singled handedly depending on their size and weight; typically these weapons are designed for single handed use. Spears up to about 2 yards in length can feasibly be used single handedly. Lances are ordinarily used whilst on horseback at a charge, thus they can be much larger and heavier than an ordinary single handed weapon given the bracing position it must be held with. The GM should adjudicate if needs be.

Polearms can be used to stun - they have a blunt end after all.

Bayonettes can be used as knives when not attached to their parent weapon, using the knife profile in bladed weapons; and as saws if they have serrated edges.

Ranged Weapons

Ranged weapons use a character's shooting skill (Pse + Per) to hit. Like close combat weapons, the skill used for determining bonuses is trained per weapon type skill. Ranged weapons that are not loaded with any particular type of special ammunition cause physical damage.

Types of Ranged Weapon

Ranged weapons consist of firearms and non-firearms. Firearms use a chemical propellant of some sort, non-firearms do not. Firearms are further defined by how they are reloaded.

Ranged weapons, firearms especially, are oftentimes given model or brand names by their manufacturers - there are innumerable types, makes and names made by a myriad of manufacturers in Echelon. To simplify things here they are listed instead by their type and the ammunition that they fire. Differing ammunition will affect the range, penetration and damage of the weapon.

All derringers, pistols, carbines, and long guns can only accept 1 type of ammunition at a time - this will be noted their profile. If the weapon is snazzy enough to include a barrel that can be removed, the calibre can be changed upon fitting a suitable barrel. On Repeating or Revolver weapons, the loading cylinder must also be changed, and the new cylinder needs to be strong enough to accept the new calibre. The different amount of energy released is between calibres is significant between smaller and larger calibre weapons. The GM should adjudicate.

Derringers and pistols may be fired with both hands for +1 to hit, as long as there is nothing in the other hand.

Carbines and long guns need either both hands or be braced on something sturdy to be fired effectively. If a character is daft or desperate enough to attempt to fire one single-handed, there is a be a -8 penalty to hit. A window frame, bipod, or the shoulder of another character could all be used as things to brace against when firing.

GM tip: If the GM feels like it, they may embellish the weapons seen here with some extras (or penalties) for an appropriate cost adjustment. Bonuses and penalties to aiming from these embellishments should not exceed +/- 4 (2 aim actions worth) from the base profile, to avoid . Range modifiers for pistols should not increase the maximum range of the weapon, but instead grant modest bonuses to the short and medium range values.

Muzzle loading firearms

Muzzle loading weapons are the oldest and simplest firearms in Echelon, with the reloads being placed inside the barrel from the front and padded down. All muzzle loaded weapons use the muzzled loaded weapons skill for determining bonuses to attacks and reloads. Muzzle loading weapons typically fire either musket balls, minié balls, or shot.

Breach loading firearms

A fairly recent innovation in firearm manufacture in Echelon is breach loading: opening the back end of the barrel to reload, rather than stuffing everything through the muzzle. A few designs contain 2 barrels that fire alternately, giving a primitive repeating mechanism: this will be noted in their clip stat as "1 or 2". All breach loading weapons use the single shot firearms skill, including multiple barrelled weapons.

Breach loading firearms all require cartridge ammunition, with the particular type of cartridge (paper or brass) noted in the weapon's profile.

Repeating firearms

Repeating firearms are amongst the most state of the art weapons currently available in Echelon. They sacrifice some accuracy at range for a much improved rate of fire. By using a cylindrical chamber, the loading cylinder, to hold rounds before firing. Once fired, the loading cylinder is cycled around ready for the next shot. Repeating firearms will have a clip size of 3 or more, and will reload slightly differently as noted in the reload section at the top of this page.

All repeating firearms require the use of cartridge ammunition, with the particular type of cartridge (paper or brass) noted in the weapon's profile.

All repeating weapons use the repeating weapons skill for determining bonuses to attacks and reloads.

White gun firearms

White guns operate completely differently from other firearms, and represent a different branch of weapon design. Instead of firing a projectile, they focus the light from a suitable explosion through a series of precise crystal lenses to emit a powerful burst of light, hot enough to cause a lot of damage. White guns do light-based physical damage: there might be some instances where magical effects may be affected.

White guns come in different calibres, describing how finely focused their light beam is. Theoretically there is no maximum limit for the calibre of a white gun, but in practice only up to 10 calibre is even feasible, and up to 6 is economical. Because of the precise engineering involved in their production and high quality materials, white guns are rare, expensive, and usually deployed as heavy guns on ships and airships.

Each successive successful hit against a target's hit location with a white gun increases the next shot's penetration by 4 on that hit location, until the armour on that location has been repaired or replaced.

All white gun weapons use the white guns skill for determining bonuses to attacks and reloads.

Primitive ranged weapons

Primitive ranged weapons encompass bows and crossbows. Primitive is a relative term, as they are generally still widely used by anyone who values their cheap cost, all-weather capability and near silent use.

For determining bonuses to attacks and reloads: bows use the bows skill, and crossbows use the crossbows skill. Because these are fairly specialized weapons with little in common with most others, training in these weapons doesn't grant half-training in any others.

Ammunition

Almost all ranged weapons require ammunition of some variety to be useful as more than expensive clubs. They require bullets, arrows, quarrels, and so forth, in order to be effective.

When buying ammunition, all costs are given as the cost per round.

The weight of ammunition is given for a number of rounds - an individual bullet tends not to weight much, but many together weigh a surprising amount. e.g., ¼kg (4) is 4 per quarter kilo. This abstraction exists because attempting to keep track of exact weights of items that are small and readily expendible like ammunition is time consuming and does not add much to the game.

Types of Ammunition

Musket balls are generally fairly crudely forged spheres of lead used for firearms. Anywhere that can form lead into crude balls can manufacture musket balls. Musket weapons are increasingly obsolete and not commonly manufactured for general sale any longer, although used and old examples abound.

Minié balls are flared at one end to better engage with a firearm's barrel. They are made from lead like musket balls, but specialist moulds are needed to produce minié ball rounds. Minié balls are the most common firearm projectile in use, as they are fairly cheap and offer acceptable accuracy at range.

Bullets are currently the most advanced firearm projectiles available in Echelon. They are manufactured to tighter tollerances than more primitive musket and minié balls, and are typically fired using rifled barrels. Because of the precision involved in their manufacture, bullets are an expensive commodity.

Shot consists of a group of lead pellets much smaller than the calibre of the firearm they are loaded into. When fired, these spread out as range increases. This makes shot ammunition very effective at close range, but much less so at further ranges. Because of the spread, a character may be able to hit more than one target with a shot. Beyond 10 metres range, if there are other characters within 1 metre of the target and within line of sight of the weapon, they will also get hit by the shot and take damage as if the shot was aimed at them. Be careful - this ability makes no distinction between friend or foe.

Arrows are among Echelon's oldest ranged projectiles, having been used since before the start of recorded history. Arrows are used by bows, and are typically made from wood with a hard tip of metal or stone. Although completely replaced by firearms in military use, arrows are still used extensively by hunters and marksmen that value their ease of crafting, cheap cost and near silent use.

Quarrels are the more advanced primitive ammunition. They are fired exclusively by crossbows, and are shorter and oftentimes heavier than arrows.

Because arrows and quarrels they move much more slowly than firearm rounds, they follow a much more pronounced balistic trajectory, which affects their comparative range.

Types of Cartridge

Ammunition for firearms comes in two variants. Either loose: where the shooter must place and pack propellant, padding, and the round into the barrel via the muzzle one after the other before firing; or in cartridges: where the propellant, padding, and round are pre-packed, and only the complete entity needs to be inserted. Cartridges can be made from paper or from brass. Any weapon that can use cartridges will note so in their profile, and some more advanced weapon designs require cartridge ammunition to function properly.

Loose ammuntion is not assumed to come with the explosive charge needed - this needs to be purchased seperately. Cartridge ammunition comes prepacked, and only needs percussion caps ready to ignite the propellant if they are not already included.

Optional Rule: Loose ammunition and paper cartridges are not entirely waterproof. If submerged or subjected to adverse weather for prolonged periods, they will not function until allowed to dry. Brass cartridges tend to be much better tend to be much better at keeping dry. If brass cartridges are subjected to conditions that would render other types too wet to use, they will only fail to fire on a d6 roll of 1, until they are dry. Roll this for each shot - if the shot fails to fire then treat the weapon as jammed, requiring reloading before being able to fire again.

Pistol and Long Gun Ammunition

Ammunition for long guns is very similar to ammunition for pistols: oftentimes they share the same calibres with only the amount of propellant being different. As long guns and carbines are stronger and heavier than pistols of all sorts, they are capable of firing a larger explosive charge. For loose musket- and minié-balls, this is not an issue as the amount of charge can be easily altered. But for paper and brass cartridges, putting a long gun round in a pistol will only serve to blow the pistol apart.

Ammunition purchased for pistols and derringers can be used in a long gun or carbine if a character needs to, but remove 1d10 or 1d6 from the damage profile (whichever type of dice are used).

Ammunition purchased for long guns and carbines can generally fit inside pistols that share the same calibre; but when fired they will render the weapon useless until it is repaired or replaced, wasting the attack. Any character attempting to fire a pistol with long gun ammunition must pass a dodge test (Agi + Per) or take damage to the arm that is holding the weapon as if they were attacked by it.

Firearms

Name Calibre
Type Dmg Range Acc Clip Reload Size Pen Wgt. Cost Rarity Notes
Musket Ball Muzzle Loaded Pistol
.50 Pistol 5d10 15/30/60 -4 1 8 4 3 3kg 55S 4 Paper cartridges available for -2 reload time
.75 Pistol 5d10 + 5 15/30/60 -6 1 8 4 3 3kg 65S 5 Paper cartridges available for -2 reload time
Muzzle Loaded Dragon (blunderbuss pistol)
.75 Pistol 4d10 -/5/30 +2 1 7 4 - 3kg 40S 5 Fires shot
1.0 Pistol 5d10 -/5/30 +2 1 7 4 - 3kg 50S 5 Fires shot
Minié Ball Muzzle Loaded Pistol
.50 Pistol 5d10 + 5 20/-/80 -3 1 8 4 4 3kg 50S 6 Paper cartridges available for -2 Reload time
.75 Pistol 6d10 20/40/80 -4 1 8 4 4 3kg 55S 7 Paper cartridges available for -2 Reload time
Minié Ball Breach Loaded Pistol
.50 Pistol 5d10 + 5 20/-/80 -3 1 5 4 4 2½kg 75S 5 Requires paper cartridge ammo
.75 Pistol 6d10 20/40/80 -4 1 5 4 4 2½kg 80S 6 Requires paper cartridge ammo
Minié Ball Breach Loaded Derringer Pistol
.50 Derringer 5d10 5/10/15 -5 1 or 2 5 2 4 1½kg 80S 6 Requires paper cartridge ammo
.75 Derringer 5d10 + 5 5/10/15 -6 1 or 2 5 2 4 1½kg 85S 7 Requires paper cartridge ammo
Brass Cartridge Breach Loaded Pistol
.33 Pistol 6d10 20/40/80 - 1 or 2 3 4 6 3kg 1G 4 Uses brass cartridge ammo
.45 Pistol 6d10 + 5 20/40/80 - 1 or 2 3 4 6 3kg 1G 4 Uses brass cartridge ammo
Brass Cartridge Breach Loaded Derringer Pistol
.33 Derringer 6d10 10/-/30 -2 1 or 2 3 2 6 1½kg 1G 20S 5 Uses brass cartridge ammo
.45 Derringer 6d10 + 5 10/-/30 -2 1 or 2 3 2 6 1½kg 1G 20S 6 Uses brass cartridge ammo
Minié Ball Revolver
.50 Pistol 5d10 + 5 20/40/80 -3 3 to 6 [3] 4 4 3kg 1G 6 Requires paper cartridge ammo
.75 Pistol 6d10 20/40/80 -4 3 to 5 [2] 4 4 3kg 1G 20S 7 Requires paper cartridge ammo
Minié Ball Pepperpot Revolver
.50 Derringer 5d10 5/10/15 -5 3 to 6 [3] 2 4 1½kg 1G 15S 7 Requires paper cartridge ammo
.75 Derringer 5d10 + 5 5/10/15 -6 3 to 5 [2] 2 4 1½kg 1G 50S 8 Requires paper cartridge ammo
Brass Cartridge Revolver
.33 Pistol 6d10 20/40/80 -2 3 to 6 [3] 4 6 3kg 2G 5 Uses brass cartridge ammo
.45 Pistol 6d10 + 5 20/40/80 -2 3 to 5 [2] 4 6 3kg 2G 50S 5 Uses brass cartridge ammo
Brass Cartridge Pepperpot Revolver
.33 Derringer 6d10 10/-/30 -4 3 to 6 [3] 2 6 1½kg 2G 75S 6 Uses brass cartridge ammo
.45 Derringer 6d10 + 5 10/-/30 -4 3 to 5 [2] 2 6 1½kg 3G 7 Uses brass cartridge ammo
Name
Type Dmg Range Acc Clip Reload Size Pen Wgt. Cost Rarity Notes
Musket Ball Muzzle Loaded Long Gun
.50 Long Gun 6d10 20/40/60 -4 1 9 7 3 5kg 45S 6 Paper cartridges available for -2 Reload time
.75 Long Gun 6d10 + 5 20/40/60 -6 1 9 7 3 5kg 50S 6 Paper cartridges available for -2 Reload time
Muzzle Loaded Blunderbuss
.75 Long Gun 5d10 -/5/30 +2 1 7 7 - 3kg 40S 6 Fires shot
1.0 Long Gun 6d10 -/5/30 +2 1 7 7 - 3kg 50S 6 Fires shot
Minié Ball Muzzle Loaded Long Gun
.50 Long Gun 6d10 40/-/160 -3 1 6 7 7 5kg 50S 4 Requires paper cartridge ammo
.75 Long Gun 6d10 + 5 40/80/160 -4 1 6 7 7 5kg 50S 5 Requires paper cartridge ammo
Minié Ball Breach Loaded Long Gun
.50 Long Gun 6d10 40/-/150 -3 1 4 7 7 4kg 50S 5 Requires paper cartridge ammo
.75 Long Gun 6d10 + 5 40/70/150 -4 1 4 7 7 4kg 50S 6 Requires paper cartridge ammo
Minié Ball Breach Loaded Carbine
.50 Carbine 6d10 40/-/70 -4 1 4 5 7 3½kg 85S 7 Requires paper cartridge ammo
.75 Carbine 6d10 + 5 40/65/80 -5 1 4 5 7 3½kg 85S 7 Requires paper cartridge ammo
Brass Cartridge Breach Loaded Long Gun
.33 Long Gun 7d10 40/80/160 - 1 or 2 3 7 10 4kg 2G 50S 4 Uses brass cartridge ammo
.45 Long Gun 7d10+5 40/80/200 - 1 or 2 3 7 10 4kg 4G 4 Uses brass cartridge ammo
Brass Cartridge Breach Loaded Carbine
.33 Carbine 7d10 40/80/120 -2 1 or 2 3 5 10 3kg 2G 5 Uses brass cartridge ammo
.45 Carbine 7d10+5 40/80/160 -2 1 or 2 3 5 10 3kg 3G 75S 5 Uses brass cartridge ammo
Brass Cartridge Revolving Long Gun
.33 Long Gun 7d10 40/60/120 -2 3 to 5 [3] 7 10 4½kg 5G 8 Uses brass cartridge ammo
.45 Long Gun 7d10+5 40/60/120 -2 3 to 5 [2] 7 10 4½kg 6G 8 Uses brass cartridge ammo
Brass Cartridge Revolving Carbine
.33 Carbine 7d10 40/60/120 -3 3 to 5 [3] 5 10 3kg 5G 9 Uses brass cartridge ammo
.45 Carbine 7d10+5 40/60/120 -3 3 to 5 [2] 5 10 3kg 6G 9 Uses brass cartridge ammo

White Guns

Name Calibre
Type Dmg Range Acc Clip Reload Size Pen Wgt. Cost Rarity Notes
White Gun 2 Long Gun 4d10 -/120/120 - 1 3 7 - 6.5kg 2G 50S 8  
  4 Long Gun 5d10 -/160/160 -2 1 3 7 - 7.5kg 5G 75S 9  
  6 Long Gun 6d10 -/160/160 -2 1 3 7 - 8.5kg 2P 2G 10  

Primitive Ranged Weapons

Name Type Dmg Range Acc Clip Reload Size Pen Wgt. Cost Rarity Notes
Small Bow Bow 5d6+SB -/SBx4/- - 1 3 4 - 1kg 3S 50C 3 Uses arrows
Short Bow Bow 6d6+SB -/SBx6/- -2 1 3 6 - 1½kg 1S 50C 2 Uses arrows
Long Bow Bow 6d6+SB -/SBx10/- -2 1 4 8 -   15S 5 Uses arrows
Crossbow Crossbow 5d10 -/160/160 - 1 10-SB* 4 - 7½kg 20S 5 Uses quarrels.
SB based reloads can go to a minimum of 3.
Can be lever operated to reduce reload time to 5 instead of 10-SB.